bitforms gallery livestream
in collaboration with
Small Data Industries

Daniel Canogar, Loom
September 10–October 25, 2020

bitforms gallery is proud to present a first of its kind, cloud-based, 24/7 stream of generative software-based art, presented in collaboration with Small Data Industries. View the debut live artwork, Loom by Daniel Canogar, May 27 – June 15, 2020.

Generative art is a performative extension of conceptual art—at its core, a set of rules encoded in software unfold in real-time. This pretense invites a series of chance outcomes that are impossible to predetermine. Generative art can often demand high levels of computational power and even requires dedicated hardware. In such cases, works can only be experienced in-person at galleries or museums. Our collaborators at Small Data Industries have developed a new cloud-based method of exhibiting generative art so that these works can, for the first time ever, be experienced on the web by the general public. This program is the first of its kind to present a series of online works without machine dependency, by leveraging powerful cloud computing generously provided by Paperspace. bitforms gallery is pleased to present this unique program with new artworks premiering every two weeks. 

Join us Wednesday, May 27 for the debut of Loom, the first live artwork in this series, made possible by Studio Daniel Canogar.  When Daniel Canogar first developed this piece, he was working in a bustling studio in Madrid. As COVID crept across Spain, his studio transitioned to an environment of complete solitude, leaving the artist to quarantine alone with his work. Loom showcases abstract animations developed with data from real-time Google Trends. Popular queries appear momentarily as overlaid text before dissolving into a smoky abstraction. These terms are approached with an accidental lyricism—each word appears and disappears in a trail of saturation. Colors within the animation are determined by the prevalence of a specific topic; the more viral the search is online, the warmer the tones become. Throughout his quarantine, the artist began to witness the unfolding effects of COVID through this piece. Stripped of headlines, graphic imagery, and statistics, each phrase inspired a contemplative experience. Now online viewers have the same opportunity, a chance to ruminate on the collective consciousness. Loom weaves a social fabric, mixing the transcendental with the banal, to present the spirit of our time in generative motion.

Auriea Harvey & Michaël Samyn, The Endless Forest
June 23 – July 7, 2020

bitforms gallery is proud to present The Endless Forest by Auriea Harvey & Michaël Samyn as the second work in a series of streaming generative artworks, presented in collaboration with Small Data Industries. The Endless Forest is an online multiplayer game where players interact as deer in a magical forest. There are no specific goals to achieve or rules to follow in the forest—players are encouraged to engage with other deer and explore and find magic in the wilderness. Access to this work has been offered online as a free download since 2005, given that users have a Windows machine and a fast 3D videocard. However, this unique collaboration with Small Data Industries allows viewers to access The Endless Forest in a live format without a Windows machine or downloadable files. In this configuration, the artwork is self-playing—referenced as Deer Observation Mode by the artists—and oscillates between a peacefully sleeping deer to variable glimpses of the lush forest and social interactions with other players (deer). 

Generative art is a performative extension of conceptual art—at its core, a set of rules encoded in software unfold in real-time. This pretense invites a series of chance outcomes that are impossible to predetermine. Generative art can often demand high levels of computational power and even requires dedicated hardware. In such cases, works can only be experienced in-person at galleries or museums. Our collaborators at Small Data Industries have developed a new cloud-based method of exhibiting generative art so that these works can, for the first time ever, be experienced on the web by the general public. This program is the first of its kind to present a series of online works without machine dependency through powerful cloud computing generously provided by Paperspace.

Marina Zurkow Mesocosm (Northumberland UK)

Marina Zurkow, Mesocosm (Northumberland, UK)
July 8 – 21, 2020

bitforms gallery is proud to present Mesocosm (Northumberland UK) by Marina Zurkow as the third piece in a series of streaming generative artworks, presented in collaboration with Small Data Industries. Generative art is a performative extension of conceptual art—at its core, a set of rules encoded in software unfold in real-time. This premise invites a series of chance outcomes that are impossible to predetermine. Generative art can often demand high levels of computational power and even requires dedicated hardware. In such cases, works can only be experienced in-person at galleries or museums. Our collaborators at Small Data Industries have developed a new cloud-based method of exhibiting generative art so that these works can, for the first time ever, be experienced on the web by the general public. This program is the first of its kind to present a series of online works without machine dependency through powerful cloud computing generously provided by Paperspace. 

Mesocosm (Northumberland, UK) is generative work that represents the passage of time on the moors of Northeast England. One hour of world time elapses in each minute of screen time, so that one year lasts 146 hours. No cycle is identical to the last, as the appearance and behavior of the human and non-human characters, as well as changes in the weather, are determined by a code using simple probability equations: seasons unfold, days pass, moons rise and set, animals come and go—all around a centrally located and almost omnipresent human figure. This passage is adapted from a text by Dr. Una Chaundhuri.

Peter Burr DIRTSCRAPER

Peter Burr, DIRTSCRAPER
September 16 – 30, 2020

bitforms gallery is proud to present DIRTSCRAPER (2019) by Peter Burr as the fourth piece in a series of streaming generative artworks, presented in collaboration with Small Data Industries. Generative art is a performative extension of conceptual art—at its core, a set of rules encoded in software unfold in real-time. This premise invites a series of chance outcomes that are impossible to predetermine. Generative art can often demand high levels of computational power and even requires dedicated hardware. In such cases, works can only be experienced in-person at galleries or museums. Our collaborators at Small Data Industries have developed a new cloud-based method of exhibiting generative art so that these works can, for the first time ever, be experienced on the web by the general public. This program is the first of its kind to present a series of online works without machine dependency through powerful cloud computing generously provided by Paperspace. 

DIRTSCRAPER is a theorized landscape of urban development that Burr has reconfigured within the framework of a website. Originally presented as an immersive interactive installation, the artist refashioned this piece to debut in an online setting as a generative video game where residents of a “smart architecture” act as informal narrators. As the formation of ‘Dirtscraper’ revolves through its cyclical feature film-length lifespan, a variety of myths emerge. Members from the virtual community tell the tale of their surroundings, relationships, and mental health in an attempt to quell the constant noise of their precarious circumstances. Burr situates this piece past archetypes of future utopias, turning instead to the corrosion of an apocryphal society. Taken as a whole, this artwork emulates a collective body that has been subjected to the inner workings of a gridded simulation: housing blocks are overrun by industry, residents are displaced, the individual withers. What remains is the story of a constantly kinetic city and the people that persist as inhabitants.

Text by Porpentine Charity Heartscape. Programming by Mark Fingerhut, additional programming by Oren Shoham. Music and sound design by John Also Bennett. Additional graphics by Brandon Blommaert, Eric Carlson, and Brenna Murphy.